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The Negative Impact of Selling a Private Practice to Hospitals and Larger Medical Groups on Patient

The healthcare industry has seen a significant shift in recent years with a growing trend of physicians selling their private practices to hospitals and larger medical groups. While some physicians may view this as an attractive option to eliminate the challenges of running a private practice, the reality is that this trend can have a negative impact on the quality of patient care.




The Negative Impact on Patient Care


When physicians sell their private practices, they lose control over their own way of practicing medicine. They become a part of a larger system, where they must follow specific protocols and procedures, and their decision-making ability may become limited. Patients may no longer have the same level of personal connection and continuity of care as they did when visiting a private practice. Physicians may be pressured to see more patients in less time, which can lead to rushed appointments and a lack of attention to detail. Additionally, the focus on the bottom line may compromise the quality of care, as physicians may be incentivized to prescribe unnecessary procedures and tests to increase revenue for the larger organization.


A study by the Journal of Health Economics found that physicians who work in larger medical groups are more likely to order additional diagnostic tests and procedures than those who work in smaller practices. This may be due to the pressure of meeting financial targets and the influence of colleagues and superiors within the organization. The study also found that patients who received care from physicians in larger medical groups had higher healthcare costs than those who received care from physicians in smaller practices.


Another disadvantage of selling a private practice to hospitals and larger medical groups is the negative financial impact it can have on physicians. While some physicians may see the sale of their practice as a way to increase their earnings, they may not fully understand the financial implications of their decision. Physicians who sell their practice typically receive a lump sum payment, which may seem like a significant amount of money at first. However, they may not consider the long-term financial effects of losing control over their practice and becoming an employee of a larger organization.


When physicians work in a larger organization, they may be subject to a lower salary and fewer benefits than they received when running their private practice. Additionally, they may not have the same level of control over their work schedule, which can impact their work-life balance. Furthermore, the sale of a private practice can result in a loss of patients, as some patients may not want to continue their care within a larger organization.


Some physicians may choose to sell their private practice to become a hospitalist, which is a physician who works exclusively within a hospital. While this may seem like an attractive option for physicians who are looking to eliminate the administrative burden of running a private practice, there are several cons to becoming a hospitalist.


Firstly, hospitalists typically have less control over patient care than primary care physicians. They may not have the same level of familiarity with the patient's medical history and may not be able to provide the same level of personalized care. Additionally, hospitalists may work longer hours and have less work-life balance than primary care physicians.


Secondly, hospitalists may have lower job satisfaction than primary care physicians. A study by the Journal of Hospital Medicine found that hospitalists reported lower job satisfaction, higher burnout rates, and lower levels of autonomy than primary care physicians. This may be due to the nature of their work, which can be emotionally and physically demanding, and the lack of continuity of care for their patients.


In addition to losing autonomy over patient care and practice management, there are other potential downsides to becoming a hospitalist. One of the biggest challenges hospitalists face is the high level of burnout that is associated with the profession (Kantrowitz-Gordon & Schorr, 2019). Hospitalists often work long, unpredictable hours, which can lead to high levels of stress and fatigue. They may also be required to work overnight shifts or cover weekend and holiday schedules, which can make it difficult to maintain a healthy work-life balance.


Another challenge facing hospitalists is the potential for conflict with other healthcare professionals. Because hospitalists are often called upon to provide care for patients who have been admitted to the hospital by other physicians, there can be disagreements over treatment plans or differences in opinion about the best course of action. This can lead to tension and conflict between hospitalists and other healthcare providers, which can have a negative impact on patient care and overall job satisfaction (Naylor & Girard, 2017).


Despite the current trend of physicians selling their private practices, it is predicted that in the future, this trend will end, and most physicians will go back to owning their own medical practices. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of personalized patient care and continuity of care. Patients have become more aware of the limitations of healthcare systems and the benefits of having a personal relationship with their healthcare provider. Additionally, advancements in technology have made it easier for physicians to manage the administrative burden of running a private practice, making it a more attractive option.


While the trend towards selling private practices to hospitals and larger medical groups may continue for the time being, there are signs that this trend may be slowing down. In recent years, there has been a growing movement among physicians to reclaim autonomy over their practices and to seek out new ways of delivering patient care that are more aligned with their own values and priorities.


Another trend that is gaining momentum is the use of technology to streamline practice management and improve patient care. Electronic health records (EHRs) and other digital tools are making it easier for physicians to manage their practices and communicate with patients in real-time. They are also helping to reduce administrative burdens and streamline the billing process, which can help to improve financial outcomes for practices (Wachter, 2016).


There are several benefits to owning a private practice, including the ability to control patient care and maintain a personal relationship with patients. Physicians who own their own practice can also have more control over their work-life balance and financial stability. Additionally, owning a private practice can provide opportunities for professional growth and development.


For those physicians who are committed to maintaining their independence and delivering high-quality patient care, there are alternative models of practice that can offer greater flexibility and autonomy. By leveraging the power of technology and focusing on patient-centered care, physicians can build successful practices that are able to thrive in an increasingly competitive and complex healthcare landscape.


while selling a private practice to hospitals and larger medical groups may seem like an attractive option for some physicians, it can have a negative impact on patient care and financial stability. Physicians who sell their practice may lose control over their way of practicing medicine and be subject to financial pressures that compromise the quality of care. Becoming a hospitalist may also result in a loss of autonomy and job satisfaction. However, owning a private practice allows physicians to maintain control over patient care, work-life balance, and financial stability. With the help of expert medical billing services, physicians can manage the administrative burden of running a private practice and provide high-quality patient care. It is predicted that in the future, the trend of selling private practices will end, and most physicians will go back to owning their own medical practices, resulting in a better healthcare industry for all.






References:


American Medical Association. (2019). Physician practice benchmark survey. Retrieved from https://www.ama-assn.org/system/files/2019-04/2018-physician-practice-benchmark-survey.pdf


Emanuel, E. J., & Pearson, S. D. (2012). Physician autonomy and health care reform. JAMA, 307(4), 367-368.


Kane, C. K. (2017). The pressures of practicing medicine: physicians report on patient care, professional satisfaction, and opportunities for improvement. The Physicians Foundation. Retrieved from https://physiciansfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/physicians-survey-results-final-2016.pdf


Kane, C. K. (2018). New study reveals opportunities for physicians to improve patient care, reduce costs and improve their own professional satisfaction. The Physicians Foundation. Retrieved from https://physiciansfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Biennial-Physician-Survey-Report-2018.pdf


Kantrowitz-Gordon, I., & Schorr, C. (2019). Hospitalist burnout: causes, consequences, and solutions. Hospital Practice, 47(1), 6-13.


Kumar, S. (2019). The state of physician practice in America: evidence from the AMA physician practice benchmark survey. Health Services Research, 54(1), 147-156.


Levinson, W., Kallewaard, M., & Bhatia, R. S. (2019). Physician autonomy and health care reform. JAMA, 321(8), 753-754.


National Center for Biotechnology Information. (n.d.). The pros and cons of being a hospitalist. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4140964/


Naylor, C. D., & Girard, F. (2017). The Canadian hospitalist landscape: trends and challenges. Journal of Hospital Medicine, 12(2), 113-117.


Rosenbaum, L. (2016). Beyond moral outrage: weighing the trade-offs of whistleblowing. New England Journal of Medicine, 374(4), 301-303.


Wachter, R. M. (2016). The digital doctor: hope, hype, and harm at the dawn of medicine's computer age. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education.


Zavadsky, M. (2018). Selling a private practice to a hospital: one physician's story. EMS World. Retrieved from https://www.emsworld.com/article/219136/selling-private-practice-hospital-one-physicians-story



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